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Posts Tagged ‘lymph nodes’

So I have to admit that because of my history I’ve got a pretty lengthy medical file that probably weighs more in pounds than it measures in thickness.  So it’s always been in my best interest to actually purchase some sort of medical ID bracelet or dog tags to give people a heads up in case something goes wrong and I’m unable to communicate.  I am, unfortunately, a true procrastinator at heart.  What makes matters worse is that, when I’m faced with a lot of decisions before reaching an end goal, I tend to drag my feet like an overweight dachshund being forced on a walk around the block.

Case in point: I probably should have had a medical ID bracelet the moment I discovered I had an allergy that led to anaphylactic shock.  That’s basically when your body reacts so severely to something that it starts shutting down.  Eyes, throat, mouth…everything swells and cuts off the necessities.  You know…like air.  It’s not a super common allergic reaction, but most that deal with it frequently tend to carry an epi-pen or other life-saving medications around for this very reason.

Of course, the trigger for that severe reaction in me only comes from one source and it’s only maintained in one environment that I’m aware of.  Medicating myself ahead of time tends to curb the reaction to the bare minimum or down to nothing at all.  While great, it may or may not have given me a reason to procrastinate on a medical ID bracelet for just that much longer.

Jump ahead several years and we’ve got Breast Cancer breathing down my neck, a full on radical mastectomy complete with lymph node removal.  Anybody who has been through this or is even remotely familiar to this procedure knows that most nurses, phlebotomists and the like tend to frown on using the arm on the side your lymph nodes have been removed.  Not only does this include drawing blood and IVs, but they also strongly advise not using blood pressure cuffs and lifting anything over a certain weight due to the strong risk of developing lymphedema.  Lymphedema, in short, is pretty much a chronic and painful swelling in the arm.  It’s an unfortunate and pretty common side effect of losing your lymph nodes, as those are what pull water and fluids from any sort of injury through to your body’s waste system (liver and kidneys, naturally).  Without them, the fluid tends to pool and collect right where it forms, causing painful swelling.  In order to control it you’re pretty much stuck with the equivalent of compression socks on your arms for life.  There’s at least some solace knowing that people do make some pretty fancy and fashionable lymphedema wraps. But, once you have it, it can flare up or calm a bit, so you’re pretty much looking at a permanent condition.  Thus far it’s one I’ve managed to avoid.  Probably in my best interest to keep it that way.

You would think that this would get me off my rear, right?  A severe allergy, risk of a painful chronic condition if somebody pokes or squeezes the wrong arm…?  Well … sort of.  It did push me to start looking around.  My major roadblock, however, was that I was also on a plethora of medications, had several doctors…had emergency numbers that should be placed on such a thing…

But when you look at most websites offering these bracelets, you’re given 4-5 lines of space to put the most important things down.  How do you prioritize?  What do you tell people if you’re found unconscious and in need of medical help?

Like…how if you’re found unconscious in a parking lot, slumped over your steering wheel…?  Stop looking at me like that.  I can feel the disapproval through your screen.

I still didn’t have a bracelet made yet when I had my adventure during that chaos.  If you consider I could open my own pharmacy with all the medications they have me on,  knowing that info in the ER would have been mighty helpful.  I lucked out in that my husband is pretty well-informed with my health, but the wrong medication, the wrong dosage, mixed with another…?  There’s no way to pretty up the fact that it could kill you or severely hamper your recovery.

So I finally did some research.  Google can be such a marvelous thing for the prepetual procrastinator.

Turns out that if you have a novel of information you want EMTs, Nurses, ER staff, doctors or even perfect strangers to know if you’re out cold…can be put onto a simple medical ID card.  Tuck it away in your wallet, call it good.  I was hesitant at first, though, knowing that most of my medications and dosages, times, etc., are prone to changing.

Turns out people have thought of that, too.

If you go here you can find a form online that you can fill out with all the information that will be needed.  Blood type, emergency numbers, allergies, address, name, conditions, medications and dosages and times …

All the stuff to make your nurse proud.

So what does that leave to put on your medical ID bracelet or dog tags?  Anything you think would be needed immediately.   For me?  My name, two emergency numbers, and a line that simply reads “SEE MEDICAL ID CARD”.

Best part?  While the medical bracelet doesn’t come free (or cheap in a lot of cases), you don’t feel so bad buying a nice one that will last knowing that there will be little cause to have to replace the actual tag in the future.  Every time something changes?   Go back, fill it out again, print it for free in any of the available card sizes, tuck it in your wallet and go on with your day.  Considering how everything else in life is far from simple, it’s nice to see at least one thing is.

 

Med ID Bracelet

I went for the functional, but I’ve got a fancy one, too. I snagged mine from Lauren’s Hope … ended up arriving super early and in great condition.

 

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There’s always that lapse of time between diagnosis and treatment that is riddled with tests and multiple doctor appointments.  Over the last two weeks I think I’ve spent a vast majority of my time in my car driving to and from the various doctors offices.  To my list of specialists I’ve added a new radiation oncologist, who has, as of yesterday, had me fitted for a new pillow.  There’s a technical term out there, but it’s essentially a plastic bean bag pillow that they lay you on and suck all of the air out of so that it forms neatly to your back.  Line it up with my old radiation dots and you’ve got a pre-posed position suitable for every radiation treatment.  After doing a little fitting the official word is that my treatments will begin next Friday.  I’ll be continuing radiation treatments for six weeks and after that there’s still the possibility of chemotherapy on top of it.  Both my oncologist and I are a bit hesitant to jump into that just yet.

Radiation is going to be a bit different, from everything I’ve been told.  I will likely have that deep sore throat that will last for far too long once more.  My heart will be exposed, as will my spine, lungs, and esophagus.  There’s a whole list of things that could turn wrong, including the risk of secondary cancers from the radiation. (Hah!  Secondary.  I think I’m a bit beyond that, somewhere in the quaternary and quinary arena.)  My radiation oncologist seemed a bit surprised that, due to how the cancer is pressing on both my esophagus and my bronchial tract that I’m not coughing up blood.  I’m not sure what to think when I’m not having an expected symptom.  Am I not coughing hard enough to make the cancer cells hemorrhage? Should I be aiming for this?  Somehow…I think I’m going to count myself lucky in this case.

Image

I live in the shadow of a volcano. This isn’t metaphorical for anything, I just..really like that volcano and this update was in dire need of a picture.

Amid all of this what do I do?  I live on.  My daughter will be registering for Kindergarten today with the same teacher that my son had.  I’m working on getting the Day Camp I help run planned and ready to run, and also trying to wrap up what commissions I have so that I’m not leaving those who’ve requested them out in the lurch.  It’s the day in and day out chaos that most people expect on some level or another.  I get by, press on, and enjoy every minute I can.  Really, what else should I do?

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Cancer has so many imprints of my shoe on it's proverbial rear at this point, I may as well add another.

Cancer has so many imprints of my shoe on it’s proverbial rear at this point, I may as well add another.

From the picture alone you can gather exactly what’s been going on in my absence from my journal.  Between taking care of my son, who is, in fact, ADHD and starting his own vast array of treatments and dealing with my side of the health spectrum, life has been nothing short of crazy.  Some things do get neglected in those situations and for that I apologize.

A few weeks after Christmas the entire family came down with a round of the worst head-cold known to the history of man.  Or at least to me.  As I watched my kids and my husband each get sick and get over their illnesses I noticed that one thing was a bit off.  My cough wasn’t getting better.  In fact, it was becoming incredibly difficult to breathe in through my right lung.  I could fill it.  But it took a lot more effort than it should have.  I didn’t do much, however, knowing that I had a CT scan scheduled for January.

Well, the CT came and went, only to show that I had a few inflamed lymph nodes.  Because of my history (I could almost trademark that statement, I hear it so often) they sent me in for another bronchoscopy a week ago to poke around.  Turns out there’s a bit of a cancerous return that’s poking into my airways–hence the difficulty breathing.  That’s right, lung cancer is back.

This time we’re not really looking at chemotherapy, for a first, and since it’s in the lymph nodes it’s not really something they can fully operate on.  So what’s on the table?

Radiation.

If you’ve been following my blog for any amount of time you’ll know that my lung cancer and breast cancer were caused by the radiation I went through ten years ago for Hodgkin’s Lymphoma.  I have my reservations, but really at this point it’s down to me having much less options due to just how much my body has gone through.  Four chemotherapies, one radiation, several surgeries, and two pregnancies can do a number on a body.  Even if they were spread out over fifteen years.  Ultimately, for me, I want a cure.  Everybody does.  That goes without question.  But if that’s not possible, I want to live as long as I can and still go kicking and screaming in the end.  It’s not just about me anymore, it’s about my children, my husband, my parents and his parents, all of my family and friends.  Even for the checker at Fred Meyer who loves to chat with me every time I get groceries.

Not to mention that I’ve been told explicitly by several people that I’m not allowed to die any time soon.  Can’t go disobeying orders now, can I?

So here is where I stand, waiting on a PET scan to make certain that this is all collected in one small area before I delve into radiation therapy.   I won’t sit here and start cackling about the prospect of possibly not losing my hair, though, since I went and drew up an entire comic on it last time…and still lost my hair.  Some day I won’t put my foot in my mouth, honest.  Either way, though, it stands to say that I’ll likely be dusting this blog off again and writing a bit more.

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